Resource Links for Event Promotion

The following links and advice will help you promote an event you are organising. Publicity for a ‘one off’ gig uses different strategies to the long-term promotion of your music as an artist.

Advice about a long-term publicity campaign to promote your music and yourself as an artist can be found on B Sharp’s Links for Music Promotion, Marketing & Getting Heard

EVENT PROMOTION ADVICE

B Sharp has written a publicity guide for promoting gigs, as part of its free online short course on event/project planning. It covers strategies to co-ordinate a multi-media campaign using press, social media, posters and how to create content that will connect with your audience etc. The guide will help you use the links below to tell your story.

Promote a Gig advice by , About.com Guide.

Watch the 2nd video (under 5 minutes) at the bottom of the page in this link, of Harvey Goldsmith, one of the UK’s iconic event promoters, giving great advice on the most important parts of event promotion. Excellent music business advice! It’s not all about publicity, it’s about problem solving and communication between a team to create the best possible experience for the audience and performers.

JamMob has useful blogs about music marketing. It has various categories such as concert promotion, social media, radio, mobile marketing, publishing and more.

The Youth Media Agency is the National home for UK Youth Media: raising the profile of, and supporting over 300 exciting media platforms. They deliver campaign and media training, working with 16-25 year olds.

PRESS RELEASES

Sending in a story of around 300 words to your local press will often get you free editorial coverage. Many more people read their local newspaper than national ones, so it is a good way to reach a potential audience who are near your gig venue. The first paragraph should use the 5 Ws rule – who, what, when, why, where. More advice about when and what to put in a press release can be found in B Sharp’s publicity guide. In addition, good advice about writing press releases has been written by Ideas Tap  and can be seen here: How to write a press release. They have also blogged Five common press release mistakes.

A really good contemporary piece of advice about press releases has been written by . It makes full use of links to social media, images and story telling. She says, “The content and structure of press releases have a far greater influence on the visibility of the message, and as competition for attention increases, the formula for a successful press release is changing. Here are some ways to freshen the news releases your organization publishes, and get more results for your campaigns.”

WEBSITE

Having a website as a promoter, or an organisation running events is an important way to keep people aware what you are doing. Your website is the place where you can tell your story in its fullest form, using text, video, audio, photos and has the ability to be designed and navigated to attract and lead viewers to what you want to say. It is important to keep it up to date. All other campaign tools can direct people to your website so you can tell your story in full. You can create QR codes for print material so that smart phones can be directed to your website on the spot, from wherever they see your poster, newspaper advert etc.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Great advice on how to use social media to promote events/organisations/projects by SoundDelivery. It explains the pros and cons of various social media sites, etiquette, and how to tell your story and interact with your audience. Some sites help you track how effective your posts are so that you can evaluate what works and prioritise your tools and time.

Facebook. Social media site to share information with friends/fans. It is an important tool to let potential customers know about what you are doing. You can create an event page and invite friends who can then invite their friends. It can be interactive and updated as news develops about your event. Facebook tools:

Twitter. Social media site for short blogs of up to 140 characters. Useful to link your more detailed story on another site.  For concise advice, see this infographic on how to create the perfect Tweet.

YouTube. Video sharing. The second biggest search engine (after Google), so a very important tool to tell your story. If you are promoting a small event, you may not have the resources or time to make a promotional video. However, one or more of your artists may have uploaded a video of their work and you can link your publicity to this. Videos are easier and more accessible for viewers than text. To make a video, see

Vimeo Same principle as YouTube. Video sharing – Upload, share, connect on your TV and phone, sell your work, promote your event.

Soundcloud. Link your event campaign to any uploads by your performers on Soundcloud. It is an online audio distribution platform which allows collaboration, promotion and distribution of audio recordings. SoundCloud enables anyone to upload, record, promote and share their originally created sounds across the internet, in a simple, accessible and feature-rich way. As an artist, it’s a good way to get feedback on music you are producing/remixing. Twitter: @SoundCloud

Mixcloud‘s mission is to deliver great radio, for everyone. They describe themselves as “Re-thinking radio, joining the dots between traditional shows, Podcasts and DJ mixes. Still curious? Check our FAQTeam page. Upload your own music, interview your band etc to make a small radio show.” You could make a short audio piece about you event and direct people to it e.g. through Facebook and Twitter.

Audioboo allows people to record and upload audio that can then be shared via other social networks. Audio can be recorded and uploaded straight from your phone or computer, allowing you to become a “social reporter” at events – where a group of people interactively and jointly contribute to some form of reporting, in text, photos, images or video. You could make a short audio piece about you event and direct people to it through Facebook and Twitter. An example of Audioboo at work is Zoe Ivory from the Big Lottery talking about the importance of blogging. Twitter: @theboobot

Blogging – opinion pieces, behind the scenes, what’s happening. They give more information than Facebook or Twitter. You could blog about the artists in your event, why you are putting the gig on, funny things that have happened when organising it etc. Lots of tips about blogging can be found on these links: basic blogging and blogging resources.  How to become an online ‘influencer’ Blog with 10 tips on how to become an influencer, as a ‘taste maker’ and opinion former.

Linkedin is a network for professionals to interact, get advice and support and make connections and endorsements. Useful for promoters, musicians and the music industry. Check out the range of groups with mutual interests e.g. Event Peeps: For Live Event Industry Professionals. The groups have lots of discussions and you can ask questions and receive advice from experienced peers.

MailChimp helps you design email newsletters, share them on social networks, integrate with services you already use, and track your results. There is MailChimp for Music.

Storify users curate what people post on social media and turn them into stories. Create your own stories about what you do, your music etc.
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Addthis. Merge tag tools for sharing – allows readers to share your music/story/campaign with their friends by connecting your posts to other sites. Add ‘follow’ and ‘share’ buttons to your social media sites.
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Hootsuite is a tool that allows you to manage all of your social media accounts in one place. Control all of your accounts on the move with the mobile version. You can set up times for posts to be released, so that a social media campaign can be coordinated to ‘amplify’ your story at times most likely to be read. Twitter: @hootsuite or @HootSuite_Help

GigaTools manages your gig promotion publicity across several social media sites. Designed for artists, DJs, bands, labels and agents to manage, promote and share their upcoming gigs online. A little like Hootsuite.

ReverbNation – Similar to Hootsuite but designed just for music. It can update all of your online profiles with new information from one central location and track stats from all of your social media sites. Reverb Nation also gives you multiple ways to sell your music, from linking to your offsite shop on your Reverb Nation profile with a free membership to having your music on iTunes and Amazon in exchange for a nominal membership fee.

Digital toolkit – websites for modern musicians seeking to promote and distribute their music, or for music entrepreneurs looking to develop their businesses.

GIG LISTINGS

Lemon Rock. A site that automatically finds your location (it asks for your permission) and then gives a local gig guide. Register your gig.

South West Music Services This is your portal to concerts, gigs and other music related events in the South West of England. If you would like a reciprocal link please get in touch. Bands, Jazz, classical and more. Register your gig.

Gig Guide provide information on Gigs, Live Music Venues, Wedding and Function Bands, Music Festivals and a host of other music related businesses in the UK. Register your gig.

Music Glue has event listings and offers services to support gigging artists. Register your gig.

Vocalist Gig Guide Add Your Gigs FREE to our online Gig Guide.  Amateur to Professional Solo & Duo Singers, Vocalists, Musicians, Songwriters, Venues, Pubs, Clubs, Covers & Original Acts.

PUTTING YOUR SHOW ON THE ROAD

You may want technical expertise or other resources for your event, whether it’s at home or you are taking a show on tour. To find what you need, you could use Showcase, the International music directory. Find contact details for a vast range of specialist suppliers to the music industry – concert services, venues, equipment, recording studios, music business services, media, musical equipment and musical equipment hire.
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Lucky Dip Music Resource Links

The following are some fun, quirky, absorbing or useful music resources. Click on one at random and see where it takes you…..

Music Jokes! Just for fun.

Association of Blind Piano Tuners website contains information about everything related to pianos, from history, makers, movers, teachers, tuners and more. A fantastic resource for all piano enthusiasts!

BandName Worldwide search and registration of band names. Why Register? Establishing prior usage is a key component in protecting your name and avoiding unwelcome legal challenges. The Worldwide Registry notifies artists and labels where potential territorial name conflicts exist and registers your historical claim to ‘name’ usage.

BBC Music – Music across the BBC.

Bemuso gives detailed advice to the self-employed independent musician. A brilliant resource.

British Music Magazines A comprehensive list of British music magazines from Wikipedia, Click on them for Wikipedia’s page about them – their background and what they cover. Links to their websites are at the bottom of their Wikipedia page under External Links.

Buying Concert TicketsDon’t get caught out by ticket cons and fraud. Advice about buying concert tickets can be found here on the Concert Promoters Association website.

Electronic music blogs like Generation BassTropical BassSoundNomadenRadio CanalhOrganikFunk and Eclectikstudio. On Facebook e.g. sublvl

Get Safe Online covers everything you can think of about internet safety, from shopping to chatting, banking, smartphones and tablets etc.

Glossary of terms used about copyright, copying and distribution of music on computers.

How to tour in a band Humourous take on touring and how to get along. Warning – lots of bad language.

International Association of Music Libraries  exists to represent and promote the interests of music librarians and libraries, music–related archives and music information providers. They have an excellent resource page with links to loads of interesting information about music.

Looking After Your Hearing – advice by Action on Hearing Loss

LP Cover Lover Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of record covers from the golden age of LPs. Lots of quirky categories.

Monkeyboxing is the “number one blog for FUNK, SOUL, HIP-HOP, NU/ GHETTO FUNK, associated MASH-UPS/ BOOTLEGS and a bit of REGGAE, SKA and PSYCH. We bring you the latest news, (p)reviews, features and release details because we’re all about the funky bumpin’ beats. Put simply, if you’re someone who thinks fat drum breaks and basslines are the apex of musical culture, then you’ve come to the right place”. Lots of links to related music and lifestyle sites. Facebook chatter.

Music facts and statistics for the UK Interesting data about music in the UK, covering UK market size and value, digital music, live music, export performance, research and publications. Compiled by The Creative Industries.

Shindig Weekender A weekend of dancing, with great DJs and live performance based on GhettoFunk. A welcoming crowd. End weekend of May.

Showcase, the international directory of the music industry, with over 10,000 contacts to choose from e.g. backline rental in Berlin through to a New York recording studio. Scroll down the categories on the left of the listings page. See the bottom of the page for common search listings – everything from tour buses, catering, legal services, stage crew and much more. A bit of a resource gem!

Social Media Handbook An excellent guide written by SoundDelivery, on using Social Media to tell your story and interact with your audience.

SoundCloud shares people’s original sounds and remixes. A strong interactive music community. If you like an artist, check out who they follow to find new related music. Twitter: @SoundCloud

Student Guide to Music Education is a free download by Rhinegold Publishing (Music, the Arts & Education specialist) giving a complete guide to music higher education.

  • Universities & Conservatoires, UK & International
  • Advice to help you choose the right place to study

Plus full listings of professional development courses.

 

The Knowledge is a leading UK-based online directory service for the video and broadcast production industry, enabling users to find film and TV contacts as well as a wide variety of production information. It helps you choose from over 20,000 UK and international production suppliers. It’s frequently updated, free to use and you don’t need to register. (You can register to get lots of free extras.) The Post Production and Sound section is particularly relevant to music.

Vocalist Everything you can think of related to singing and music generally! A fantastic resource for all musicians. One of the best and most comprehensive music information and networking sites on the internet! Every link takes you into a new world.

WFMU – FM is a listener-supported, non-commercial radio station and is currently the longest running freeform radio station in the United States. Worth checking out. WFMU’s programming ranges from flat-out uncategorizable strangeness to rock and roll, experimental music, 78 RPM Records, jazz, psychedelia, hip-hop, electronica, hand-cranked wax cylinders, punk rock, gospel, exotica, R&B, radio improvisation, cooking instructions, classic radio airchecks, found sound, dopey call-in shows, interviews with obscure radio personalities and notable science-world luminaries, spoken word collages, Andrew Lloyd Webber soundtracks in languages other than English as well as Country and western music.

Women in Music is a national membership organisation that celebrates women’s music making across all genres of music. They raise awareness of gender issues in music and support women musicians in their professional development. They have links to other organisations that are useful for female musicians.

Links to Progress your Music Interests and Journey

B Sharp has created a number of blogs that aim to help young people (and others) progress their musical journey beyond the activities we offer.

The blogs give links to websites that may be useful to them. Safety on the internet is particularly important for children and young people, and we have posted safety guidelines here.  B Sharp has come across these sites while looking for potentially useful information and has posted them here in good faith.

The links have been grouped into topics, and can be found by clicking on the topic titles below.

Links for Singing

Links To Buying Musical Instruments and Equipment

Links to Funding Support for Individual Musicians and Music Entrepreneurs

Links to Music Training and Colleges

Links to Music Jobs and Volunteering

Links to Early Years Music Resources

Links to Music Resources and Support

Links to Music and Health

Links To Youth Enterprise And Music Business

Resource Links for Event Promotion

Links for Music Promotion, Marketing & Getting Heard

Links to Music Blogs/News/Discussion/Interaction

Links to Finding/Discovering Music

Links to What’s On? Music Listings

Links to Music Festivals

Links To Classical Music

Links to Organisations Supporting Young People’s Music Education

Links to Music Industry Organisations

We hope these posts will be useful and enjoyable to explore. We look forward to your feedback and receiving additional information that we can pass on.

B Sharp has also posted notes on event and project planning. They are aimed at young people who want to make thing happen, and to encourage innovation and enterprise in music. The notes are under different topics such as aims & objectives, budgets, marketing, etc. They can be found in Ideas Into Action.

This B Sharp resource website has been developed as part of our current project, The Big Mix, funded by Youth Music, West Dorset District Council and Lyme Regis Town Council. We are very grateful to have their support.

Publicity

Telling Your Story

Your project is a great story. Why would you be doing it if it wasn’t worth the trouble?Letting people know about your project is important. What’s the point of having the best event in the world if no one knows about it?

In addition to these notes, it is worth looking at Promote a Gig. For musicians, these blogs giving lots of advice on Music Promotion.

Before the age of the Internet and social media, a general guide was to use 10% of your budget for publicity/marketing/branding – telling your story. If your target market uses new media, you may be able to reach people more cheaply.

To carry out a good awareness campaign takes time. Plan for this. How can you tell your story and pass on the good news?

Press Releases

content-marketing-278x300

Image sourced from Daily Blogma

More people read local newspapers than nationals. They are a good way to reach local audiences.  Press coverage is free if the publisher writes a story about you, so you get editorial coverage rather than have to pay for an advert (you may decide it is also worth paying for an eye-catching advert to strengthen/amplify the article). They may do this after interviewing you or after receiving a press release from you. A press release is a story written by you and sent to the editor. Press releases are the safest way to ensure your message is told in the way you want. Misunderstandings in an interview or different emphasis created by a journalist can distort what you want to say.

Press releases should be about 300 words. Editors generally cut from the bottom up so get your message into the first paragraph using the 5 ‘W’s rule – Who, What, When, Why and Where. For the editor, put your contact details (and those of other partners if they could give more information) at the bottom and when you want the article published e.g. ‘For immediate release’ or ‘Embargoed until 21 March 2013’.

Try to use some quotes from people involved so that enthusiasm and personal touches can be shown to readers. This will warm and excite the story.

You may want magazines to tell your story. Find out when they want information so that you  get it to them in good time, for the edition you want. They may publish once a month or even less frequently, so make sure you have your press information planned well in advance.

Good advice about writing press releases has been written by Ideas Tap  and can be seen here: How to write a press release. They have also blogged Five common press release mistakes

A really good contemporary piece of advice about press releases has been written by . It makes full use of links to social media, images and strory telling. She says, “The content and structure of press releases have a far greater influence on the visibility of the message, and as competition for attention increases, the formula for a successful press release is changing. Here are some ways to freshen the news releases your organisation publishes, and get more results for your campaigns.”

Website

Having a website as a promoter, or an organisation running events is an important way to keep people aware what you are doing. Your website is the place where you can tell your story in its fullest form, using text, video, audio, photos and has the ability to be designed and navigated to attract and lead viewers to what you want to say. It is important to keep it up to date. All other campaign tools can direct people to your website so you can tell your story in full.

Social Media

The Internet is becoming increasingly important. Half of public relations is about getting other people to repeat your messages. Social media is a great way to do this. Create content and experiences that people will want to share, then use a mix of digital tools to ‘amplify’ them across all media to support your campaigns. Be friendly, fun and interactive. Tell your story through a website and use the variety of social media sites available – they are generally free. Scroll down this list of services to see what is available.

You can refer to a detailed story e.g. on your website, blog or video through shorter sound bites and links on e.g. Twitter or Facebook. Lead people to where you want them to go by cross-linking information.

Remember – if you are doing more than a one off event and you want to be known as a promoter, its not all about you and what you put on. You need to become part of an online community with mutual interests. In a blog ‘Voluntary sector marketing myths‘ Zoe Amar says, “You won’t reap the full benefits of social media unless you use it to have conversations with your stakeholders. This is particularly true of Twitter. Social media expert Kirsty Marrins advises charities to follow the “rule of thirds”, ie one third of your tweets should be used to push out your charity’s content, one third to engage in conversations, and one third to share content from other useful sources.”

SoundDelivery have written fantastic guides on using social media for campaigns and marketing. See their Social Media Handbook The handbook was originally written for organisations supporting families, but the principles are good for all campaigns. The useful bits are from page 5 onwards.

Also see the blog  A beginner’s guide… to sharing content online using 5 really useful websites by Rebeka Haigh on the Youth Music network site.

Some examples of tips:

  • Use photos in Facebook posts – no more than 10 in an album. If you want to show more, use Flickr, an image and video hosting site.
  • YouTube – make 2-4 minute videos to tell a story. Plan your story before filming.
  • Twitter – allowed 140 characters but try to use 120 or less (this allows retweeters to add on a little extra information or @somene to your message). Twitter automatically shortens web addresses to 20 characters – a web link in your tweet can expand your story.
  • Audio Boo – Record a message or an interview and add photos and links. People can listen to an interview while looking at photos and reading a little background information.
  • Hootsuite – links all your social media sites and can schedule times to post things, so you can co-ordinate a media campaign in advance, before it’s launch and prepare tweets etc for times people are most likely to look at them.
  • Blogging – opinion pieces, behind the scenes, what’s happening. They give more information than Facebook or Twitter. Lots of tips about blogging can be found on these links: basic blogging and blogging resources.
  • Blog a maximum of 500 words – you want the blog on one page. People can comment on blogs. Ask questions to create interaction.
  • Update blogs about once a week. Blogs are archived and you can tag words to link to other blogs and websites. All the blue words in this article/blog, and throughout B Sharp’s Resources website, are tagged to take you to more information if you click on them.
  • Find blogs with Google blog search.
  • You can use Google alert to find out what’s being said about you – keeping you aware of how your brand is doing.
  • You can shorten web addresses using services such as bitly.com. Bitly also monitors how many people use the link, so you can measure how effective your campaign is.

Other useful guides are:

A Guide to Twitter

hootsuite-guide

Tumblr guide

Creating a Fanpage on Facebook

Blog writing tips

8 Top Tips for Writing Excellent Blog Posts

When publicising an event/campaign/service, try to use at least 10 ways to tell your story (or ‘amplify’ your story) e.g. a mix of press releases, posters, facebook, Twitter, Audio Boo, YouTube, blogs with e.g. Tumblr, e-mail, mobile texts, word of mouth, newsletters, partnership networks, merchandising with a message (T-shirts/mugs/pens etc), sandwich/blackboards, publicity stunts.

Quick Response Codes

If you have a website, always have its address on any publicity material. On posters and adverts, use QR (Quick Response) bar codes for smart phones to link people immediately to your website and/or social network sites. This example takes you to B Sharp’s main website:

B Sharp website QR code

B Sharp website QR code

There are many free QR generators to choose from. Your website has the fullest capacity to tell your story, keep people updated and be a point of contact. Regularly review your website and keep it up to date.

Creating Content

Creating good content in the various media you use is important. It should be relevant to the people you are targeting. What is it you are offering that they want? What are they going to get out of it? Concentrate on the product/service/event you are offering and not yourself and how good you or your organisation is. Fun, quirky and memorable content will motivate  people to share and help spread your message and brand. Think about ways your customers and others can help promote your project and encourage this.

A comprehensive guide to creating content can be found in the document ‘The Advanced Guide To Content Marketing‘ by Quicksprout.

Other advice:

  • A content strategy should focus on existing customers as well as prospects. Content marketing is a great tool to create brand affinity but can also be powerful in building a new audience of potential customers.
  • An amplification strategy should be a key tactic in a content strategy. Once the content is created, search and social networks can be used to distribute, but you should also make sure to distribute it out to others who may not know it exists. Intent is not created in a search box.
  • Invest in the appropriate resources to meet your objectives.
  • Stay honest and true to the brand

Anything you give away can be used to capture data about your customers e.g. by asking for contact details as a condition of the gift, so you can reach them in future campaigns.

You can build data bases of customers using social networks. If you are a musician selling your music, you could offer a reward such as a free music download on e.g on Soundcloud if people join your Facebook page. They are unlikely to leave it, and later on you can promote tracks you are selling, publicise gigs and other news to your new facebook fans.

If you were promoting a band, why not try to get trend setters or ‘influencers’ on board – journalists, bloggers etc who are recognized influencers? Send samples of music, invites to gigs etc. If they start to relay your messages there is less pressure on just you to get your message out, and it’s less likely you’ll be seen as a nuisance constantly broadcasting your own agenda and business.

How to become an online influencer is a useful blog with 10 handy tips.

To find the list and links to all B Sharp’s posts about event and project planning, go here: Ideas into Action

Links to other music resources, compiled by B Sharp, can be found here. Particularly relevant to publicity is the page Links for Music Promotion, Marketing & Getting Heard.

Links for Music Promotion, Marketing & Getting Heard

These links can help you promote your music and find an audience.

Music Promotion, Marketing & Getting Heard Resources:

Advice

B Sharp has written a publicity guide for promoting gigs, as part of its short course on event/project planning. The guide will help you use the links below to tell your story.

If you are using this page to help promote your music in general, there may be different strategies to use than those for a one event gig promotion. Promoting your music or musicianship as a professional is a long-term campaign and needs to nurture fan/music industry relationships.

The music industry is changing, in response to new technology. Jim Mawdsley of Generator summed it up well in a Youth Music blog. “The music industry, as we all know, has changed irrevocably over the last decade; despite what many skeptics say digital hasn’t killed it off but it has largely forced a reinvention by introducing new creation, distribution and consumption models.

“That elusive first ‘deal’ no longer exists – record companies and publishers are no longer the risk aggregators they once were.  They are looking for young artists who already have cross-platform visibility, a fan-base and performance experience – those that are ‘industry-ready.’” See their video Artist Development – Getting Noticed.

The first steps in a career as a creative artist in the music industry is down to you to be ‘industry ready’. You need to get out there, perform and build a fan base.  Many musicians are using the internet to create fans, get them to come to gigs and sell music online, cutting out the role of record labels.

A good article about identifying who your fans are and their different levels of loyalty are explained in Everything You Need To Know About Band Management Part 5: Fans. In addition to live music, an important strategy to gain fans is to let people hear your music for free. The internet is a good tool for this and there are many links below for that.

If you want to sign to a label to help your career, you need to think about how you let people hear your music online. In a LInkedIn discussion about breaking into the music industry, Peter Neefs, an executive producer at Free Lance said that record labels won’t touch music that has been posted on Soundcloud, YouTube etc because there are so many ways to download the music for free from social network sites. In addition, sales figures wouldn’t be picked up by chart compilers such as AC Nielson because tracks by artists without a label behind them rarely get registered for ISRC or ISWC codes. He advises artists to directly approach A & R managers at record labels. Sensible advice about placing your music with TV shows, radio etc can be found on this blog by Mark Alan.

The pros and cons of going with a label or not may be the subject of a future blog. In the meantime, more information about codes, royalty collection societies and record labels can be found on Bemuso.

If you research the advice links below, a consistent message about getting recognised is that personal engagement and networking is key to the success of promoting your work. Random/spam messaging can be annoying and counter productive. Understand your audience, research key people and influencers such as A&R managers, promoters and music journalists and target stories that will appeal to them. It’s not all about you. Engage with peer social media posts to develop networks. They can help you later.

In a blog ‘Voluntary sector marketing myths‘ Zoe Amar says, “You won’t reap the full benefits of social media unless you use it to have conversations with your stakeholders. This is particularly true of Twitter. Social media expert Kirsty Marrins advises charities to follow the “rule of thirds”, ie one third of your tweets should be used to push out your charity’s content, one third to engage in conversations, and one third to share content from other useful sources.” This is good advice for any profession using social media, including musicians.

OTHER PEOPLE’S ADVICE AND LINKS:

Music/Artist promotion 7 chapters, by Alex Pollock, in blog format giving advice, examples and practice ‘work sheets’, about:

How to get more gigs as a performing musician A podcast by Tiffany Goodman, veteran booking agent, that helps you learn about

  • The importance of video in your marketing
  • Tips for building a presence with photos, a website, and social media
  • The difference between a manager and agent
  • Tips for cold calling and using your network
  • How to develop and maintain an agent-artist relationship
  • And much more!

How to get people to share your content is a good blog on Socialbrite by John Haydon aimed at NGOs but applicable for musicians.

Getting taste makers to share your music is a a good strategy. See Tippers Network below on the `Organisations section, and their tastemakers

There is nothing like live music to create a fan base. Gigs and touring are really important. Generator have a very good information page about playing live and how to get gigs. Generator have all sorts of other good advice about training for musicians and the music industry, preparing artists to be ‘industry ready’.

If you want to tour and expand your fan base, this blog gives advice on types of emails you should never send to venue managers.

Tips on Sharing Your Success – a Youth Music blog with a download of 20 questions to ask yourself about what you are doing, and tips on how to present what you say so that you can share your successes and tell your story well. The blog is aimed at music educator professionals sharing best practice but is transferable to building any business brand.

Bemuso is an excellent resource for indie artists and has thorough and good advice about how to promote yourself as a DIY independent musician, with good tips on using social media and music websites.

Songhack helps artists “hack the music industry”. It’s a consumer guide to over 100 digital products and services targeted at musicians. Songhack features news, resources and coaching content to help musicians make money.

BBC advice for unsigned and undiscovered musicians. Starting out, Recording, Playing Live, Getting Noticed and Online Promotion, Getting the Right Deal for You, Useful Links.

BBC Introducing Masterclass video clips 2013. Dozens of 1 – 2 minute interview clips of great promotion and music industry advice from artists and professionals e.g. Gig exchanges – invite a similar band from a town some way away to play with you, and you play with them in their town.

New ways of touring Jen Long of BBC Introducing talks about new ways to tour, especially reaching young people who can’t get in to over 18s venues. (The latest BPI research shows that 13 to 19-year-olds are the second biggest recorded music market after early 20-somethings, so it’s good to find ways to let them see you live.)

Music Clout is a website with lots of advice on promotion and advancing yourself in the music industry. You can upload your artist profile and find opportunities for your music. You can find listings and submit music and info to Licensing opportunities, Record Labels, Blogs, Press, Management, Festivals, and Radio and Contests etc seeking new artists.

Getting demos heard and distributed. A goldmine of more than 40 great websites to promote your music, compiled by The Vocalist, one of the best music resources on the web.

All things Busking – tips, articles and lists of busking festivals to get yourself out there.

Berklee Music College have various free video lessons on music business, promotion and careers.

Music Promotion Lots of blogs with advice on music promotion.

JamMob has useful blogs about music marketing. It has various categories such as concert promotion, social media, radio, mobile marketing, publishing and more.

For Bands and Musicians. Get all the info you need from this series of blogs to take your music to the masses, from finding members for your band to self promoting your music, getting shows and signing a fair contract.
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Rock n Retail Advice on web marketing and options to buy marketing services. USA based.

Social Media

Short BBC video by music industry experts ‘Making the most of Online‘ – talking about the importance of an online presence as an artist and building a strategy to present yourself well.

Social Media Handbook An excellent guide written by SoundDelivery, on using Social Media to tell your story and interact with your audience.

Great advice on how to use social media to promote organisations/projects. Similar to the handbook above, also by SoundDelivery.

The importance of a good personal photo for your various social network profiles is explained here.

Top 4 Social Media Marketing Fundamentals for Indie Musicians – a blog from Think Like A Label, ‘a resource for musicians and their people’.

YouTube. Video sharing. The second biggest search engine (after Google), so a very important tool to tell your story, and easier for viewers to understand your message than text. See YouTube tips and tutorials e.g. why it’s so important. Another useful blog: The Musicians Guide To YouTube Marketing.

Vimeo Video sharing – Upload, share, connect on your TV and phone, sell your work.

Soundcloud. An online audio distribution platform which allows collaboration, promotion and distribution of audio recordings. SoundCloud enables anyone to upload, record, promote and share their originally created sounds across the internet, in a simple, accessible and feature-rich way. A good way to get feedback on music you are producing/remixing. Twitter: @SoundCloud

Bandcamp is “perhaps today’s most essential web service for independent bands and musicians.” At the heart of Bandcamp is a simple, utilitarian premise: Allow fans to listen to your music for free, and enable flexible, reasonable pricing for music purchases. Bands have the option of collecting email addresses, set fees or pay-what-you-want amounts in exchange for their music. You can also sell merch. It’s the quickest way to a free band website. Bandcamp gets 15% of music revenue and 10% of merch.

Mixcloud‘s mission is to deliver great radio, for everyone. They describe themselves as “Re-thinking radio, joining the dots between traditional shows, Podcasts and DJ mixes. Still curious? Check our FAQ, Team page. Upload your own music, interview your band etc to make a small radio show.”

Audioboo allows people to record and upload audio that can then be shared via other social networks. Audio can be recorded and uploaded straight from your phone or computer, allowing you to become a “social reporter” at events – where a group of people interactively and jointly contribute to some form of reporting, in text, photos, images or video. An example of Audioboo at work is Zoe Ivory from the Big Lottery talking about the importance of blogging. Twitter: @theboobot

Facebook. Social media site to share information with friends/fans. It is an important tool to let potential customers know about what you are doing. You can create an event page and invite friends who can then invite their friends. It can be interactive and updated as news develops about your event. Facebook tools:

Twitter. Social media site for short blogs of up to 140 characters. Useful to link to your more detailed story on another site.

DeCloudr is a web app that converts your Social Media followers (i.e. Facebook, SoundCloud) into Twitter followers by means of offering a Follow for a Free Download. Build your DeCloudr profile, upload your tracks and send them to your SoundCloud or Facebook followers and watch the Twitter Followers come flooding in!

Blogging – opinion pieces, behind the scenes, what’s happening. They give more information than Facebook or Twitter. Lots of tips about blogging can be found on these links: basic blogging and blogging resources. Youth Music has written 8 Top Tips for Writing Excellent Blog Posts. A blog with 10 tips on how to become an influencer, as a ‘taste maker’ and opinion former – How to become an online ‘influencer’.

Linkedin is a network for professionals to interact, get advice and support and make connections and endorsements. Useful for musicians and the music industry. Check out the range of groups with mutual interests e.g. Music and Entertainment Professionals. The groups have lots of discussions and you can ask questions and receive advice from experienced peers.

MailChimp helps you design email newsletters, share them on social networks, integrate with services you already use, and track your results. There is MailChimp for Music.

Pocket When you find something you want to view later, put it in Pocket.
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Storify users curate what people post on social media and turn them into stories. Create your own stories about what you do, your music etc.
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Addthis. Merge tag tools for sharing – allows readers to share your music/story/campaign with their friends by connecting your posts to other sites. Add ‘follow’ and ‘share’ buttons to your social media sites.

Hootsuite is a tool that allows you to manage all of your social media accounts in one place. Control all of your accounts on the move with the mobile version. You can set up times for posts to be released, so that a social media campaign can be coordinated to ‘amplify’ your story at times most likely to be read. Twitter: @hootsuite or @HootSuite_Help

GigaTools manages your gig promotion publicity across several social media sites. Designed for artists, DJs, bands, labels and agents to manage, promote and share their upcoming gigs online. A little like Hootsuite.

ReverbNation – Similar to Hootsuite but designed just for music. It can update all of your online profiles with new information from one central location and track stats from all of your social media sites. Reverb Nation also gives you multiple ways to sell your music, from linking to your offsite shop on your Reverb Nation profile with a free membership to having your music on iTunes and Amazon in exchange for a nominal membership fee.

Digital toolkit – websites for modern musicians seeking to promote and distribute their music, or for music entrepreneurs looking to develop their businesses.

Help to make and post videos onto YouTube.

How to convert audio files to video to upload to YouTube.

Fandalism site profiling musicians. Facebook: Fandalism

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Gig Listings

Dorset Gig Guide The Dorset Music Guide aims to be the definitive destination for Music related News, Reviews and Events Information for the wonderful county from which it takes it’s name. Twitter: @DorMusicGuide

Lemon Rock. A site that automatically finds your location (it asks for your permission) and then gives a local gig guide. Register your gig.

South West Music Services This is your portal to concerts, gigs and other music related events in the South West of England. If you would like a reciprocal link please get in touch. Bands, Jazz, classical and more. Register your gig.

Gig Guide provide information on Gigs, Live Music Venues, Wedding and Function Bands, Music Festivals and a host of other music related businesses in the UK. Register your gig.

Music Glue has event listings and offers services to support gigging artists. Register your gig.

Vocalist Gig Guide Add Your Gigs FREE to our online Gig Guide.  Amateur to Professional Solo & Duo Singers, Vocalists, Musicians, Songwriters, Venues, Pubs, Clubs, Covers & Original Acts.

Bandsintown Facebook ap that tells you when bands you like on Facebook have up and coming gigs. Good to register as an artist.

Recording/Demo Production

The Showcase music industry directory is a great resource for finding expertise and facilities to record and show your music at its best. E.g. Rehearsal Rooms, South West Recording Studios (also other regions), mobile recording studios, studio equipment hire and recording services such as producers/engineers/programmers, mastering, post production, packaging, design and printing – lots more.

Organisations

BandName Worldwide search and registration of band names. Why Register? Establishing prior usage is a key component in protecting your name and avoiding unwelcome legal challenges. The Worldwide Registry notifies artists and labels where potential territorial name conflicts exist and registers your historical claim to ‘name’ usage.
Email: information@bandname.com

Be On The Scene “An online community for talented individuals to showcase your talent – come & get involved!” They give you the tools to help you get noticed. Twitter: @BeOnTheScene

Showcase International music directory. Find contact details for a vast range of specialist suppliers to the music industry – concert services, venues, equipment, recording studios, music business services, media, musical equipment and musical equipment hire.

Federation of Festivals. Charity giving young people the opportunity to perform at amateur festivals throughout the UK with on average a million performers a year. Twitter: @Brit_Festivals

Apply to play at Festivals A blog by Sentric Music with contact links to apply to over 20 UK music festivals. Festival experience is something record labels look for before signing you, as do some grants such as The Momentum Fund from the PRS Foundation to help emerging artists get to the next level.

Music for Youth is a national music education charity providing free access to performance and audience opportunities for young musicians across the UK through its annual season of festivals and concerts.

BBC Introducing support unsigned, undiscovered & under the radar musicians | No need to Tweet links, just upload your tunes at bbc.in/Uploader. Twitter: @bbc_introducing

Tippers Network UK new music tastemakers recommending new music and artists. A public list by Generator. The contributing tastemakers are here. Check out their interests and try sending appropriate tastemakers your music and information about you as an artist. Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeneratorNE/lists/tippers-network

FAQs about the BBC uploader and how to get your music to the BBC.

The Unsigned Guide. Online music industry directory full of contacts for UK venues, producers, gig & festival promoters, record labels, music publishers, distributors & loads more! Twitter: @unsignedguide

The Youth Media Agency is the National home for UK Youth Media: raising the profile of, and supporting over 300 exciting media platforms. They deliver campaign and media training, working with 16-25 year olds.

Urban Street Online service focused in the promotion and marketing of individuals and organisations providing professional musical services.

Tribe of Noise conects musicians online with businesses around the globe in need of original, all rights included music.

Independant Record Labels These record labels are distributed by Kudos Records. There are quite a few! They may be interested in your music. Find out if they record similar styles of music to yours. Find out about their A & R managers and contact them.

NUMU describe themselves as “a safe community for young people to showcase their music; collaborate, compete and develop their talent.” FIND OUT MORE

List with links to lots of record labels, compiled by NUMU.

Play Music is a hub for emerging musicians in the UK. PlayMusic selects up-and-coming artists to showcase their music through a series of live and studio sessions. They are a part of PlayNetwork who create in store digital environments, including background music for major retail brands,

cdbaby. Independent music store, distributor, CD duplication service, advice, blogs.

Getting yourself heard. This page has a list of online music databases that are largely free of charge. Note that many of the sites provide a specialized service or focus on a particular music genre. Some of these operate as an online music store or purchase referral service in some capacity.

A list of Internet radio stations in the UK. Go to home page for the rest of Europe (over 4,000 radio stations listed by country or genre). Send tracks/blogs/press releases to stations to promote your music. Be selective and target stations that play your style of music.

Comparison of streaming media systems – Tables that compare general and technical information for a number of streaming media systems for both audio and video. Tools to show your work at its best.

Booking Agents and related searches such as Music Entertainment Agencies on ukmmf.net – adverts and web searches.

Public Relations companies – a small directory of  PR companies to help tell your story. There are many others. As well as telling your story yourself, using B Sharp’s publicity guide, PR companies may have good contacts and many social media followers and influencers worth paying for. Choose one that is well-connected to the music industry.

 

A complete B Sharp music resource menu can be found in  Links to Progress your Music Interests and Journey. If you know of other links that could be added to this list, please reply below.