Resource Links for Event Promotion

The following links and advice will help you promote an event you are organising. Publicity for a ‘one off’ gig uses different strategies to the long-term promotion of your music as an artist.

Advice about a long-term publicity campaign to promote your music and yourself as an artist can be found on B Sharp’s Links for Music Promotion, Marketing & Getting Heard

EVENT PROMOTION ADVICE

B Sharp has written a publicity guide for promoting gigs, as part of its free online short course on event/project planning. It covers strategies to co-ordinate a multi-media campaign using press, social media, posters and how to create content that will connect with your audience etc. The guide will help you use the links below to tell your story.

Promote a Gig advice by , About.com Guide.

Watch the 2nd video (under 5 minutes) at the bottom of the page in this link, of Harvey Goldsmith, one of the UK’s iconic event promoters, giving great advice on the most important parts of event promotion. Excellent music business advice! It’s not all about publicity, it’s about problem solving and communication between a team to create the best possible experience for the audience and performers.

JamMob has useful blogs about music marketing. It has various categories such as concert promotion, social media, radio, mobile marketing, publishing and more.

The Youth Media Agency is the National home for UK Youth Media: raising the profile of, and supporting over 300 exciting media platforms. They deliver campaign and media training, working with 16-25 year olds.

PRESS RELEASES

Sending in a story of around 300 words to your local press will often get you free editorial coverage. Many more people read their local newspaper than national ones, so it is a good way to reach a potential audience who are near your gig venue. The first paragraph should use the 5 Ws rule – who, what, when, why, where. More advice about when and what to put in a press release can be found in B Sharp’s publicity guide. In addition, good advice about writing press releases has been written by Ideas Tap  and can be seen here: How to write a press release. They have also blogged Five common press release mistakes.

A really good contemporary piece of advice about press releases has been written by . It makes full use of links to social media, images and story telling. She says, “The content and structure of press releases have a far greater influence on the visibility of the message, and as competition for attention increases, the formula for a successful press release is changing. Here are some ways to freshen the news releases your organization publishes, and get more results for your campaigns.”

WEBSITE

Having a website as a promoter, or an organisation running events is an important way to keep people aware what you are doing. Your website is the place where you can tell your story in its fullest form, using text, video, audio, photos and has the ability to be designed and navigated to attract and lead viewers to what you want to say. It is important to keep it up to date. All other campaign tools can direct people to your website so you can tell your story in full. You can create QR codes for print material so that smart phones can be directed to your website on the spot, from wherever they see your poster, newspaper advert etc.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Great advice on how to use social media to promote events/organisations/projects by SoundDelivery. It explains the pros and cons of various social media sites, etiquette, and how to tell your story and interact with your audience. Some sites help you track how effective your posts are so that you can evaluate what works and prioritise your tools and time.

Facebook. Social media site to share information with friends/fans. It is an important tool to let potential customers know about what you are doing. You can create an event page and invite friends who can then invite their friends. It can be interactive and updated as news develops about your event. Facebook tools:

Twitter. Social media site for short blogs of up to 140 characters. Useful to link your more detailed story on another site.  For concise advice, see this infographic on how to create the perfect Tweet.

YouTube. Video sharing. The second biggest search engine (after Google), so a very important tool to tell your story. If you are promoting a small event, you may not have the resources or time to make a promotional video. However, one or more of your artists may have uploaded a video of their work and you can link your publicity to this. Videos are easier and more accessible for viewers than text. To make a video, see

Vimeo Same principle as YouTube. Video sharing – Upload, share, connect on your TV and phone, sell your work, promote your event.

Soundcloud. Link your event campaign to any uploads by your performers on Soundcloud. It is an online audio distribution platform which allows collaboration, promotion and distribution of audio recordings. SoundCloud enables anyone to upload, record, promote and share their originally created sounds across the internet, in a simple, accessible and feature-rich way. As an artist, it’s a good way to get feedback on music you are producing/remixing. Twitter: @SoundCloud

Mixcloud‘s mission is to deliver great radio, for everyone. They describe themselves as “Re-thinking radio, joining the dots between traditional shows, Podcasts and DJ mixes. Still curious? Check our FAQTeam page. Upload your own music, interview your band etc to make a small radio show.” You could make a short audio piece about you event and direct people to it e.g. through Facebook and Twitter.

Audioboo allows people to record and upload audio that can then be shared via other social networks. Audio can be recorded and uploaded straight from your phone or computer, allowing you to become a “social reporter” at events – where a group of people interactively and jointly contribute to some form of reporting, in text, photos, images or video. You could make a short audio piece about you event and direct people to it through Facebook and Twitter. An example of Audioboo at work is Zoe Ivory from the Big Lottery talking about the importance of blogging. Twitter: @theboobot

Blogging – opinion pieces, behind the scenes, what’s happening. They give more information than Facebook or Twitter. You could blog about the artists in your event, why you are putting the gig on, funny things that have happened when organising it etc. Lots of tips about blogging can be found on these links: basic blogging and blogging resources.  How to become an online ‘influencer’ Blog with 10 tips on how to become an influencer, as a ‘taste maker’ and opinion former.

Linkedin is a network for professionals to interact, get advice and support and make connections and endorsements. Useful for promoters, musicians and the music industry. Check out the range of groups with mutual interests e.g. Event Peeps: For Live Event Industry Professionals. The groups have lots of discussions and you can ask questions and receive advice from experienced peers.

MailChimp helps you design email newsletters, share them on social networks, integrate with services you already use, and track your results. There is MailChimp for Music.

Storify users curate what people post on social media and turn them into stories. Create your own stories about what you do, your music etc.
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Addthis. Merge tag tools for sharing – allows readers to share your music/story/campaign with their friends by connecting your posts to other sites. Add ‘follow’ and ‘share’ buttons to your social media sites.
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Hootsuite is a tool that allows you to manage all of your social media accounts in one place. Control all of your accounts on the move with the mobile version. You can set up times for posts to be released, so that a social media campaign can be coordinated to ‘amplify’ your story at times most likely to be read. Twitter: @hootsuite or @HootSuite_Help

GigaTools manages your gig promotion publicity across several social media sites. Designed for artists, DJs, bands, labels and agents to manage, promote and share their upcoming gigs online. A little like Hootsuite.

ReverbNation – Similar to Hootsuite but designed just for music. It can update all of your online profiles with new information from one central location and track stats from all of your social media sites. Reverb Nation also gives you multiple ways to sell your music, from linking to your offsite shop on your Reverb Nation profile with a free membership to having your music on iTunes and Amazon in exchange for a nominal membership fee.

Digital toolkit – websites for modern musicians seeking to promote and distribute their music, or for music entrepreneurs looking to develop their businesses.

GIG LISTINGS

Lemon Rock. A site that automatically finds your location (it asks for your permission) and then gives a local gig guide. Register your gig.

South West Music Services This is your portal to concerts, gigs and other music related events in the South West of England. If you would like a reciprocal link please get in touch. Bands, Jazz, classical and more. Register your gig.

Gig Guide provide information on Gigs, Live Music Venues, Wedding and Function Bands, Music Festivals and a host of other music related businesses in the UK. Register your gig.

Music Glue has event listings and offers services to support gigging artists. Register your gig.

Vocalist Gig Guide Add Your Gigs FREE to our online Gig Guide.  Amateur to Professional Solo & Duo Singers, Vocalists, Musicians, Songwriters, Venues, Pubs, Clubs, Covers & Original Acts.

PUTTING YOUR SHOW ON THE ROAD

You may want technical expertise or other resources for your event, whether it’s at home or you are taking a show on tour. To find what you need, you could use Showcase, the International music directory. Find contact details for a vast range of specialist suppliers to the music industry – concert services, venues, equipment, recording studios, music business services, media, musical equipment and musical equipment hire.
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2 thoughts on “Resource Links for Event Promotion

  1. Event Technology is developing and defining the way we plan and create events in brand new ways.

    Many event professionals are still catching up with the new trends in the industry and aren’t implementing these new tools.

    But several others have taken to the idea…

    Many event professionals, businesses and individuals have been adapting to these new technologies and using them to ​there advantage, producing events that simply WOW people.

    But what we all want to find out is, will technology define the success of events in 2016?

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